Canon 7D, EOS Flashes, Lenses, Canon, Canon 60D, Nikon

Canon 7D vs. Canon 70D, My Experience

The Canon 7D was released onto the world in the fall of 2009. Literally for 2½ year, it didn't have any competition. It took almost 3 years for Nikon to come up with something in almost the same league. What a fantastic camera! 18Mpx, a very complicated but flexible focusing system and a buffer of 15 images increased to 23 images with version 2 of the firmware (I never got the official 25 images) and 8 frames per second. With its 2 CPUs, the 7D felt lightning fast.

Fall 2013, Canon releases the 70D, with 20Mpx, 7 frames per second, and what looks like a subset of the 7D's AF system.

Canon: Generic Batteries

For everyone of my cameras, I have 2 batteries. One in current use and the other one fully charged. The Canon LP-E6 for the 7D, the 5DMkII… is the first battery, for me, that allowed me to make more than 1,000 photos per charge. Actually at the beginning, I was getting around 2,500 photos per charge! That's two 32Gb CF cards.

How Tough is Your Camera?

I'm not sure that I would really want to test how tough is my camera, but some other dudes, at Digital Rev, tested the Canon 7D. Think of it as the “Jackass” movie but for cameras. For me it is much funnier since nobody gets hurt.

Canon 7D — Focus Solution

Running dog almost out of focus, Canon 7D

Running dog almost out of focus, Canon 7D

I had problems with the focus for this image. We have a black 1½ years old dog, running at “full speed” toward me. His name is “Flash”. Almost all the photos are out of focus. Here is a sample at 1:1.

The Canon Timers

The Canon 7D has 4 different timers:

  • 4 seconds
  • 6 seconds
  • 10 seconds
  • 16 seconds

The 4 seconds timer

  • The LCD panel and viewfinder information display their information after the half shutter button press.
  • The review time for the photos. Configured through the Shoot 1 (red) menu as a 2 seconds (the default), a 4 seconds or an 8 seconds.
  • Exposure compensation after pressing the shutter button
  • Metering timer.

Life and Death of Batteries: Flashes

Cameras and flashes are powered by electricity. Most of it comes from batteries. But they use different battery technology. All modern cameras use Lithium-Ion batteries (Li) see: http://www.foto-biz.com/Canon/Life-and-death-of-batteries-part-1 while most modern flashes use Nickel Metal Hybrid (NiMH) based batteries. The reason is that cameras do not have a big and heavy electricity drain, while flash requires huge power for a short period of time. Lithium Ion batteries are lighter but they do not do last long under the heavy power load that the flash requires.

Move Over, I am a Pro

Move over, I am a pro. I have a Nikon D4 and Nikon Pro Services stickers all over my 600mm. Don't come close to me, that's my view. I own it.

Nikon Professional Services

Nikon Professional Services

The guy walked, not only like he owned the place but like everybody was supposed to bow to him.

New Canon Lens Caps

Finally Canon has rejoined the rest of the world by doing the same as every other lens manufacturer did 15 years ago. Canon has introduced the center pinched lens caps. Something must be right with Canon, the prices are not out of the Canon world:

Life and Death of Batteries: Cameras

This is the part one of a two parts about batteries and it affects us as photographers.

The battery technology is extremely old and hasn't changed much since the 1830s, yes that is 180 years ago. Some chemicals have changed but not the physics of the batteries. And right now, the biggest drag on technology is the battery technology.

MFA: The DOT-Tune Problems

Over the last while, there has been a lot of activities about somebody having find a better and faster way of doing the Micro-Focus Adjustment under 5 minutes. The guy did an 18 minutes youtube video available at: http://youtu.be/7zE50jCUPhM

DotTune: Autofocus Fine Tuning in Under 5 Minutes

Syndicate content